Close Attractions

The Coach House Bed & Breakfast


Windermere Steamboats Museum - Windermere


Windermere Steamboats & Museum is located on a former sand wharf site where, for many years, barges unloaded gravel dredged from the bed of the lake. When this operation ceased in 1975, the Windermere Nautical Trust acquired the use of the site and the Museum was built in 1976-77 with the help of The Maritime Trust and the English Tourist Board. For a great day out visit the Windermere Steamboats & Museum situated on the shores of beautiful Lake Windermere. This Windermere attraction offers a unique and historic collection of Steam and Motor Boats. Steam Launch Trips, Shop and Refreshments. The Museum is open 10am to 5pm daily from mid-March to the first week in November


World of Beatrix Potter - Bowness-on-Windermere


The World of Beatrix Potter Attraction can be found in Windermere. The attraction as won a number of awards and is One of the Top Ten most Popular Visitor Centres and the centre is a place for all the family young and old. Within the centre you will discover Peter Rabbit, Jemima Puddle Duck and all their friends in a magical indoor recreation of Beatrix Potter classic tales, with the sights, sounds and also the smells of the countryside. You will be able to see Mrs. Tiggy-winkle in the Kitchen, go past Jeremy Fisher's Pond and even walk through Squirrel Nutkin's Old Oak Tree? Also at the centre you will be able to learn more about Beatrix Potter's life in the Hidden Beatrix Potter's presentation and video wall. Take a break in the Tailor of Gloucester Tea Rooms and then a visit to shop where you can browse and purchase top quality Beatrix Potter merchandise.


Fell Foot Park


Fell Foot Park is situated on the south shores of Lake Windermere just of the A592 and in the care of The National Trust. The Victorian park is open daily with its eighteen [18] acre grounds that have been restored to its former glory to which you will see in spring and early summer displays of daffodils and rhododendrons. The park in winter is open with limited facilities see below. You can relax and have a picnic on the lawns next to the lake and watch the boats go by, or you could take a boat trip from the park across the lake to Lakeside and take a Lakes Windermere Cruise, even a trip on the The Lakeside & Haverthwaite Railway or visit to the Aquarium. If you wish you could hire a rowing boat on the lake, there is a children adventure playground, a shop in which you can purchase National Trust gifts with a tea room close by serving teas, coffee and light meals.


National Trust Wray Castle


Wray Castle is a Victorian neo-gothic building at Claife in the English county of Cumbria. The house and grounds have belonged to the National Trust since 1929, but the house has only recently opened to the public on a regular basis. The grounds, which include part of the shoreline of Windermere, are open all year round and are renowned for their selection of specimen trees –Wellingtonia, redwood, Ginkgo biloba, weeping lime and varieties of beech. Between March and October, Windermere Lake Cruises operate a passenger boat service from Ambleside and the Brockhole National Park Visitor Centre to Wray Castle.


Brockhole on Windermere, The Lake District Visitor Centre


The Brockhole Lake District Visitor Centre, also known as the Brockhole National Park Visitor Centre, is a visitor centre and tourist attraction managed by the Lake District National Park Authority. It is situated on the shore of Lake Windermere, roughly equidistant between the towns of Bowness-on-Windermere and Ambleside. It includes the Brockhole house and 30 acres of grounds, including 10 acres of formal gardens and an adventure playground. The centre organises a number of activities, including orienteering, kayaking and open water swimming, as well as regular exhibitions. The site that is now the visitor centre was bought in 1896 by William Gaddum, a silk merchant from Manchester, as a summer house. He had the house built the following year, to a design by the architect Dan Gibson. The gardens were created by Thomas Mawson, known for his work in the design of gardens during the Arts and Crafts movement. Beatrix Potter was a frequent visitor to the house, and makes reference to it in her Journals. In 1946 William Gaddum died and the house was sold. In 1948 the house was converted into a convalescent home.


Book Online